secure
0.050.09975

Human Resources Forum

Theme: What are the risks of transmission of COVID-19 by occupation and industry?

Online Event

Wednesday 7 Oct 2020
From 11AM To 12PM

 

CIRANO invited its partners to an exclusive Human Resources Forum on the theme of "What are the risks of transmission of COVID-19 by occupation and industry?".

 

Marie Connolly, Full Professor in the Department of Economics at the École des sciences de la gestion of the Université du Québec à Montréal, CIRANO Researcher and Fellow, presented a tool for visualizing risks and benefits related to COVID-19 by industrial sector and by occupation.

 

The tool was adapted for Quebec by two CIRANO Researchers and Professors at ESG UQAM, Marie Connolly and Catherine Haeck, and provides a better understanding of the relationship between the risks of transmission of the virus and the economy. It can be consulted to (1) guide decisions surrounding sector closures related to the second wave and also to (2) help identify occupations at risk within industries and find ways to mitigate these risks. The tool looks at the characteristics of the occupations most likely to spread the virus, as well as the characteristics of the workers themselves and their living environment. A risk index for viral transmission has been calculated for each occupation and integrates different factors such as physical proximity, exposure to disease, contact with others, face-to-face discussions, use of public transit, living in crowded housing or living with a health care worker. Marie Connolly presented the methodology and functionality of the tool as well as some highlights of the data analysis.

 

This presentation was followed by a period of exchange of ideas, experiences and knowledge with partners.

Marie Connolly

A CIRANO Researcher and Fellow since 2009, Marie Connolly is Full Professor in the Department of Economics at the École des sciences de la gestion of the Université du Québec à Montréal. She is also founder and director of the Research Group on Human Capital.

Holding a Ph.D. in Economics from Princeton University, her research is primarily empirical and touches upon various topics in labor economics, such as social mobility, the formation of human capital, the gender wage gap, subjective well-being, women’s labor force participation and the evaluation of public policy. She is also interested in the economics of popular music, including the resale of concert tickets and the environmental practices of rock bands.

Her work as been published in the Journal of Labor Economics, the Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization and the Canadian Journal of Economics, among others.

[ - ]
[ + ]
Website Security Test