Since Mancur Olson's "Logic of collective action" it is common conviction in social sciences that in large groups the prospects of a successful organization of collective actions are rather bad. Following Olson’s logic, the impact of an individual’s costly contribution becomes smaller if the group gets larger and, consequently, the incentive to cooperate decreases with group size. Conducting a series of laboratory experiments with large groups of up to 100 subjects, we demonstrate that Olson's logic does not generally account for observed behavior. Large groups in which the impact of an individual contribution is almost negligible are still able to provide a public good in the same way as small groups in which the impact of an individual contribution is much higher. Nevertheless, we find that small variations of the MPCR in large groups have a strong effect on contributions. We develop a hypothesis concerning the interplay of MPCR and group size, which is based on the assumption that the salience of the advantages of mutual cooperation plays a decisive role. This hypothesis is successfully tested in a second series of experiments. Our result raises hopes that the chance to organize collective action of large groups is much higher than expected so far.







Voir le document

Dernières publications

2018s-10 CS
The Effect of Education on Health: Evidence from National Compulsory Schooling Reforms
Raquel Fonseca Benito, Pierre-Carl Michaud et Yuhui Zheng
Voir le document

2018RP-04 RP
Mesure des bénéfices des projets en technologies de l’information
Simon Bourdeau, Pierre Hadaya et Philippe Marchildon
Voir le document

2018s-08 CS
Bargaining and the Role of Negotiators’ Competitiveness
Claudia Keser, Stephan Müller, Emmanuel Peterlé et Holger A. Rau
Voir le document


Centre interuniversitaire de recherche en analyse des organisations
1130 rue Sherbrooke Ouest, suite 1400
Montréal, Québec (Canada) H3A 2M8
(514) 985-4000
(514) 985-4039
reception@cirano.qc.ca

© 2018 CIRANO. Tous droits réservés.



Partenaire de :